Tiny Homes

Do you want to learn more about tiny home, maybe build your own? This book will help.

Sunday, March 12, 2017

Harvesting & Eating Dandelions

Here in Northen New Brunswick, a cold wind blows. Snow lies deep upon the garden but Spring is coming, yes it is. With the arrival of Spring comes dandelions, one of the first sources of nectar for bees and other pollinators. so do not fear dandelions but embrace them. Here is how.

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Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Do You Grow Heritage Tomatoes?

My heritage tomato seed collection is growing if you will pardon the unintended pun. I am still deciding which tomatoes I will plant this year but between buying new varieties and saving seeds from past years,  I have a good basic heritage tomato seed collection.

What heritage tomatoes are you growing?

Friday, March 3, 2017

Cucumbers

My seeds are arriving, not that I actually need seeds but there is something comforting about having my own seed library.

Next week my column will talk about one of my favourite summer vegetables, the cucumber. I am trying a new variety this season and will keep you posted with photos as to how it works out.

Thursday, March 2, 2017

Galerie Restigouche Gallery: Heritage Garden Project.

The Heritage Garden Project created by the Galerie Restigouche Gallery is based on information gather from information generously provided by the Kings Landing Historical Settlement. 

A second source was the book, written by Wesley Greene, “Vegetable Gardening, The Colonial Williamsburg Way.”
The seeds used in the Heritage garden are based upon the information Kings Landing provided.  The garden will grow onions, peas, beans, squash.\ and a few other varieties.


We plan to save seeds from the garden and replant them each Spring 2018. In this way, we will develop plants that are accustomed to the region. In time, we may be able to make some of these seeds available to local gardeners.  Herbs and plants that were used for medicinal purposes will play a vital part in creating this living testimony that is the Heritage Garden. 

The Heritage Garden project will create a legacy through its documentation using both digital video and still photography. The videos and photos will be posted on the Facebook page set up for the Historic Garden.

Photographs will illustrate the work being done and will be accompanied by a clear language text enabling visitors easy access to the content and context of this Garden.  It is our hope this approach will assist in learning and to becoming familiar with the gardening methods and the plants being utilized for the project.  

 The only tools used will be those available at the time and no artificial ingredients will be employed in the garden.

The final event will be a harvest meal prepared using the produce grown and members of the community will be invited to sit down and enjoy the feast.

Monday, February 13, 2017

Vegetables in Containers

You can grow your favourite vegetables in containers as all vegetables will do well in a container provided that container is big enough for the vegetable.
For example, if you try to grow even cherry tomatoes in a three inch diameter terra cot pot you are going to be disappointed; however, if you use a three gallon container or any container that is at least 24 inches across and 18 inches deep you will be able to enjoy tomatoes fresh from your own garden.
Add some basil which grows very well with tomatoes and you are all set.
You can grow cucumbers, green peppers and zucchini in the same size (24x18) containers. For both zucchini and cucumbers, you may want to add a trellis to the container to keep the plant growing upright.
For soil, I recommend that you purchase an organic potting soil, one that is designed fro growing vegetables, from you local plant nursery. If you are new to container gardening, it is worth the time to have a chat with the nursery manger and let her or him know what your plans are. They will be able to make suggestions for selecting vegetables that are ideal for your region.

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

Saved Bean Seeds

These are just a few of the seeds I saved from last year's gardens.




Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Gardening: Raised Beds

So you do not want to kneel down or bend over to garden, well you do not have to, simply raise the garden up, and reduce the effort required to do your gardening chores.
There are many ways to raise the garden up, you can put down some straw bales and plant right into them. You can put containers on a table or other platform; if you use a bench that a chair can slide under you can sit down and garden.
You can build your own raised bed garden using wood, bricks, concrete blocks, rubber tires, or compost and earth piled up above the ground. The approach you take is up to you and your needs, the time and resources you have available.
In a hurry, buy some organic soil, cut a slit into the bag and plant right into this, if you want it higher, put it on a table or bench.
If you choose to build a raised bed from wood for example, or buy a kit, the most workable size for the bed is four feet across, this way you can reach anywhere in the bed without stepping into it and compacting the soil by a minimum of eight feet long. You can make it longer or build more than one raised bed that is up to you and your situation.
One of the advantages to using a raised bed, besides the ease of gardening, is that the soil in the raised will warm up faster in the spring and you can get an early start. Another advantage to a raised bed is you can build a seat or two along the edge of the bed so that nine who is gardening can sit down while doing so.
The ease of access means that the various gardening chores, such as planting, weeding, deadheading, watering and perhaps the most fun, harvesting require less effort.
The organic gardener grows soil and this is often done by adding organic material such as compost to the soil. The raised bed make this a simple process because you first, control the soil you put in the bed so can start off with an ideal mix from day one, and second, a wheelbarrow and your hands, wearing gloves, of course, will be all you need to add the compost to the bed.