Thursday, April 13, 2017

Why Study Permaculture Part One


Permaculture is a holistic, nature-inspired design methodology that can be used grow food, build businesses and create communities.
There are a number of reasons why a permaculture course is valuable. Permaculture design can assist you to reduce your ecological footprint while saving you money, time and energy. This illustrates a permaculture concept- taking one action and accomplishing three or more tasks.
If you are interested in learning more about permaculture, I recommend that you begin with an introductory course. This allows you to find out if you are intrigued enough to develop you knowledge and skills further or if you just want to take what you know and apply it your yoru daily life and work.
Unless you want to become a teacher or permaculture design consultant, the intro course is all you need.
However, if you seek more and want to consult and or teach then further work and learning is required.
If you have your own land and want to grow all or much of your own food, the intro course will help you decide whether or not this is a realistic goal. If you are convinced that you can indeed grow the food you need than it is time to take a closer look at the permaculture design certificate (PDC). The PDC is also essential if you wish to become a permaculture teacher or to take more advanced permaculture design courses.

Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Lawns









Large or small we do love our lawns. We value them so highly we curse the so-called weeds without realizing they are doing us a service. But, I will talk about this service in another column.
Our passion, perhaps for some an obsession, with our lawns, dates back to a time when not using space to grow food was a sign of wealth.
People still devote hours and dollars to maintain a lawn that may look good but requires constant attention and far too many people rely on toxic chemicals to keep the green, green.
Lawns are important. They provide a place for BBQs, family gatherings, a playground for the children and space for pets to roam. Lawns are needed but not in all cases and perhaps, in some, they could be smaller.
Considering how people use lawns, picture children and the family dog rolling on the lush, green grass, why would anyone want to spray any toxic chemicals simply to control weeds. There are healthier ways.
The first step in going chemical free is to determine what uses the back-yard serves, i.e. what does your family do there? 

Excerpt from last week's Campbellton From My Garden column. Stay connected for details about my coming ebook.

Thursday, April 6, 2017

Bee City Campbellton



 Bees are pollinators, not the only ones, but the honey bee is most likely the best known. Bumble bees also help the plants they visit grow. You can see both honey and bumble bees going about their business in any thriving garden.

The City of Campbellton has recently undertaken a major step in recognizing the value of the bee and the services they provide us.

City Council has passed a resolution that names Campbellton a Bee City. By becoming a Bee City, we have agreed to join with other communities across Canada, to protect, promote and celebrate pollinators. The Galerie Restigouche Gallery is coordinating the Bee City efforts through this Facebook page.

Sunday, March 12, 2017

Harvesting & Eating Dandelions

Here in Northen New Brunswick, a cold wind blows. Snow lies deep upon the garden but Spring is coming, yes it is. With the arrival of Spring comes dandelions, one of the first sources of nectar for bees and other pollinators. so do not fear dandelions but embrace them. Here is how.

More 

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Do You Grow Heritage Tomatoes?

My heritage tomato seed collection is growing if you will pardon the unintended pun. I am still deciding which tomatoes I will plant this year but between buying new varieties and saving seeds from past years,  I have a good basic heritage tomato seed collection.

What heritage tomatoes are you growing?

Friday, March 3, 2017

Cucumbers

My seeds are arriving, not that I actually need seeds but there is something comforting about having my own seed library.

Next week my column will talk about one of my favourite summer vegetables, the cucumber. I am trying a new variety this season and will keep you posted with photos as to how it works out.

Thursday, March 2, 2017

Galerie Restigouche Gallery: Heritage Garden Project.

The Heritage Garden Project created by the Galerie Restigouche Gallery is based on information gather from information generously provided by the Kings Landing Historical Settlement. 

A second source was the book, written by Wesley Greene, “Vegetable Gardening, The Colonial Williamsburg Way.”
The seeds used in the Heritage garden are based upon the information Kings Landing provided.  The garden will grow onions, peas, beans, squash.\ and a few other varieties.


We plan to save seeds from the garden and replant them each Spring 2018. In this way, we will develop plants that are accustomed to the region. In time, we may be able to make some of these seeds available to local gardeners.  Herbs and plants that were used for medicinal purposes will play a vital part in creating this living testimony that is the Heritage Garden. 

The Heritage Garden project will create a legacy through its documentation using both digital video and still photography. The videos and photos will be posted on the Facebook page set up for the Historic Garden.

Photographs will illustrate the work being done and will be accompanied by a clear language text enabling visitors easy access to the content and context of this Garden.  It is our hope this approach will assist in learning and to becoming familiar with the gardening methods and the plants being utilized for the project.  

 The only tools used will be those available at the time and no artificial ingredients will be employed in the garden.

The final event will be a harvest meal prepared using the produce grown and members of the community will be invited to sit down and enjoy the feast.